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Resume Writing for High School Students
Sample Resume Objective
Sample Resume Objective Section

Social Studies teachers might assign students the task of creating a resume for an historical figure at a certain time in their life. They could compare resumes of presidents before they were elected. What famous person was a haberdasher and who was a house painter before they stepped on the world stage? List what a resume is used for: Discuss which are good and which are not. There are some good ones from teens on www.

This should lead into a discussion of the basics of resume writing. Resumes must be typed Print resumes on high quality paper — office supply stores call it resume paper Keep your resume to one page Use a proper format — use a template Write in the active voice No: I have written Yes: I wrote Focus on these three skills — point out to students that even if they have no work experience, they should have skills to put in a resume communication skills problem solving skills technical skills Pay attention to words Brainstorm a list of words with students to use on resumes.

They should come up with to get the idea of work-oriented action words. Check, check and double check and then have someone else proof it Create a worksheet or some questions that include things teens can put on a resume. Things to be included: Work experience if they have any. For the last three years, Education World has presented a new group of getting-to-know-you ideas -- or icebreakers -- for those first days of school. Here are 19 ideas -- ideas tried and tested by Education World readers -- to help develop classroom camaraderie during the opening days of school.

Opening-Day Letter Still looking for more ideas? Don't forget our archive of more than icebreaker activities. Write a letter to your students. In that letter, introduce yourself to students. Tell them about your hopes for the new school year and some of the fun things you'll be doing in class. In addition, tell students a few personal things about yourself; for example, your likes and dislikes, what you did over the summer, and your hobbies.

Ask questions throughout the letter. You might ask what students like most about school, what they did during the summer, what their goals for the new school year are, or what they are really good at. In your letter, be sure to model the correct parts of a friendly letter! On the first day of school, display your letter on an overhead projector.

Then pass each student a sheet of nice stationery. Have the students write return letters to you. In this letter, they will need to answer some of your questions and tell you about themselves. This is a great way to get to know each other in a personal way! Mail the letter to students before school starts, and enclose a sheet of stationery for kids to write you back.

Each piece should have a matching piece of the same length. There should be enough pieces so that each student will have one. Then give each student one piece of string, and challenge each student to find the other student who has a string of the same length. After students find their matches, they can take turns introducing themselves to one another. You can provide a list of questions to help students "break the ice," or students can come up with their own.

You might extend the activity by having each student introduce his or her partner to the class. Give each student a slip of paper with the name of an animal on it.

Then give students instructions for the activity: They must locate the other members of their animal group by imitating that animal's sound only. No talking is allowed. The students might hesitate initially, but that hesitation soon gives way to a cacophony of sound as the kids moo, snort, and giggle their way into groups. The end result is that students have found their way into their homerooms or advisory groups for the school year, and the initial barriers to good teamwork have already been broken.

Hold a large ball of yarn. Start by telling the students something about yourself. Then roll the ball of yarn to a student without letting go of the end of the yarn. The student who gets the ball of yarn tells his or her name and something good about himself or herself.

Then the student rolls the yarn to somebody else, holding on to the strand of yarn. Soon students have created a giant web.

After everyone has spoken, you and all the students stand up, continuing to hold the yarn. Start a discussion of how this activity relates to the idea of teamwork -- for example, the students need to work together and not let others down.

To drive home your point about teamwork, have one student drop his or her strand of yarn; that will demonstrate to students how the web weakens if the class isn't working together. Questions might include the following: What is your name? Where were you born? How many brothers or sisters do you have? What are their names? Do you have any pets? Tell students to write those questions on a piece of paper and to add to that paper five more questions they could ask someone they don't know.

Pair students, and have each student interview his or her partner and record the responses. Then have each student use the interview responses to write a "dictionary definition" of his or her partner to include in a Student Dictionary. You might model this activity by creating a sample dictionary definition about yourself. Born in Riverside, California. No brothers or sisters. Have students bring in small pictures of themselves to paste next to their entries in the Student Dictionary.

Bind the definitions into a book, and display it at back-to-school night. Ask each student to write a brief description of his or her physical characteristics on one index card and his or her name on the other. Physical characteristics usually do not include clothing, but if you teach the primary grades, you might allow students to include clothing in their descriptions.

Put all the physical characteristic index cards in a shoe box, mix them up, and distribute one card to each student, making sure that no student gets his or her own card. Give students ten minutes to search for the person who fits the description on the card they hold.

There is no talking during this activity, but students can walk around the room. At the end of the activity, tell students to write on the card the name of the student who best matches the description.

Then have students share their results. How many students guessed correctly? Patricia McHugh, John W. Set up a circle of chairs with one less chair than the number of students in the class. Play music as the students circle around the chairs. When the music stops, the students must sit in a seat. Unlike the traditional game, the person without a seat is not out. Instead, someone must make room for that person. Then remove another seat and start the music again.

The kids end up on one another's laps and sharing chairs! You can play this game outside, and you can end it whenever you wish. Afterward, stress the teamwork and cooperation the game took, and how students needed to accept one another to be successful. Reinforce that idea by repeating this game throughout the year. Danielle Weston, Willard School, Sanford, Maine Hands-On Activity Have students begin this activity by listing at least 25 words that describe them and the things they like.

No sentences allowed, just words! Then ask each student to use a dark pen to trace the pattern of his or her hand with the fingers spread apart. Provide another sheet of paper that the student can place on top of the tracing. Because the tracing was done with a dark pen, the outline should be visible on the sheet below. People who read resumes expect them to include specific information, such as your name, address, contact information, education, past jobs, volunteer experience, and special skills.

If a resume does not look like a traditional resume, the reader may be confused and think the writer is not educated about writing proper resumes. For a resume to be effective, it must demonstrate your knowledge of both function and form.

An effective resume - Has a clear purpose that shows why you are writing it - Is visually appropriate and appealing, or easy to read - Includes all the necessary information about the writer - Is grammatically correct with no errors in punctuation or spelling Share copies of the resume printout.

You might begin discussing these by putting students into small groups first to review. Tell them to identify what they see as the 3 Fs: Function, Form, and e Ffectiveness. Return together as a class, and discuss each F and how students determined what it was. Discuss the two types of resume: Ask students which style they think is best for them.

Show the sample resumes from the previous lesson. Ask students to identify which one is chronological and which one is functional. If you are not in a computer lab or a room with Internet access, tell students to view these sites later on their own. Getting Started as a guide.

Begin completing the parts of the printout. Move around the room answering questions as students work. Ask students to complete the printout on their own before the next lesson. Put them into small groups to share their work with others. Bring the class back together and ask students questions about their process. What was easy about filling this out? What sections contained the most and least information? Ask for volunteers to share what they included in each section with the class.

Begin a discussion about the importance of audience and purpose when creating a resume, as these are fundamental items to consider when putting all of their information together. Points to note include the following: The audience refers to anyone who will review the resume, so we must consider all audiences, both primary and secondary. The purpose refers to why the audience is looking at the resume and what they will be looking for, so we must ask ourselves what they want to read.

Connect audience and purpose to the 3Fs as discussed in the previous class. Ask students to comment on how these are related and why they are important. Graphic Organizer printout to fill out and bring to the next class. They can do this individually or in small groups. Have them log into the Resume Builder site.

As they do so, remind them about the time limit for creating their draft in class. They should structure their time accordingly. Getting Started printout, ask students to go through the process of entering their information. Show students the features of the tool, from the additional information about resumes on the first page to the audio feature accompanying the site that enables them to hear the information aloud.

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Lesson Plan 4 RESUME WRITING OBJECTIVE: Upon successful completion, students will be able to create a complete resume representing their skills, experience.

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homework helpers word searches Custom Resume Writing Lesson Plan middle country public library homework help dissertation meaning of the word. Guide to Writing Lesson Plans; Topics. Back To School; Cultural Heritage & Diversity; Elections; Field Trip Fun; Resume Writing for Teens By – Jennie Withers Language Arts teachers may choose to have students write a resume for a character in a novel or story instead or as a warm-up for students writing their own resume. For example.

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This lesson plan introduces the resume basics. Although the cover letter is a part of the video, this lesson specifically targets the resume. Review students’ printouts for The 3 Fs of Resume Writing, My Resume Ideas: Getting Started, Visualizing Your Resume: Graphic Organizer, Visualizing Your Cover Letter: Graphic Organizer, and Steps to Creating a Cover Letter after each lesson in which they are used or collected.